Fixing the Hallway Clock

August 25, 2019


Way back in '98 or '99 we found this beautiful clock at a yard sale for $5.


When asked if the clock worked, the lady said it did, but lost time almost immediately.  Instantly we knew the problem, she had forgotten Newton's laws of motion, and hadn't adjusted the bob or the lyre.  


The pendulum length dictates how fast or how slow your grandfather clock will keep the proper time. If you take time to adjust it properly, the grandfather clock can keep exceptionally good time for a mechanical timekeeper.
  • The longer you make the pendulum, the slower the grandfather clock.
  • The shorter you make the pendulum, the faster the grandfather clock.
Adjusting the speed of the clock is accomplished by moving the pendulum disk (bob) up or down. This is adjusted by turning the nut at the bottom of the pendulum. Moving it up pushes the “bob” (the round disk) up so the clock will run faster. If you turn the nut as to lower the “bob”, the clock will run slower. The pendulum disk is moved up or down by turning the adjustment nut. - The Clock Depot


Not only did we know what the problem was, the clock was also a perfect fit for 173.  The color was almost a perfect match to the woodwork here, there was also architectural interest in that the column flutes had black accents, and there were acanthus leaves to add interest.  AND - did I say it cost $5?  But the time-keeping wasn't the issue that took so long to fix.  The problem was embarrassingly simple to fix, but it had escaped my mind!  If you look at the picture above it can be quite clear - the top finial is missing!  A number of years ago I bought this finial to put on the clock:


But I just didn't think the shape matched the feel of the clock.  Fast forward waaay too many years, and I finally sought out, purchased, stained and applied a decent finial!


First I had to enlarge the hole in the top of the clock to fit the finial tenon.  I was worried about drilling to deep so I measured the depth, which was almost nothing...


and put a depth collar on the bit...


resulting in the perfect size hole...


And wah-lah after all these years the clock has a finial!


And now the clock looks complete!


Thanks for checking in!

The Shed Rehab: Finished!

August 11, 2019


I think just about every project I lament my complete inability to estimate the time it will take to do a project, and this project was no exception.  The first post was way back on June 26, and here we are on August 11th and it's finally finished!  What I didn't figure was the number of either rainy days, or days that were too humid to paint, not to mention some tasks I hadn't thought of.  First a bit of recap...


That's an odd-looking shot of when I first built the shed.  I forget exactly when I built it, but it was at least 15, if not closer to 20 years ago. That's really quite amazing because I built it on the cheap, back then we really had to pinch pennies. Yet, the shed has held up well all these years! But alas, the ol' shed was really starting to show its age...


I started out by replacing all the corner boards, as well as the door and window frames, and added a sill to the window...


Then the frieze board (or whatever the correct name is) was added:


Then the caulking and priming was done...


And by the end of the last post, way back on July 7th, the shed was primed and ready!


The next step was one of those I hadn't previously thought of, the window.  That old basement window was in serious need of repair!  I used the trusty old heat gun to take out all the old window glazing...


Then sanded it down to the bare wood...


Then, after priming and painting the frame, it was time to re-glaze.  First the glazier's points went in...


Then the glaze, which really takes practice and patience...


Then the painting began!


I wanted the shed to have the same color theme as the house...


So, can you see where this is going?


After all the walls and trim were painted, it was time for the door.  And here you can see that we went with Goldenrod to match the doors on the house!


And here she is!


Ah, what's that on the side you say?  I'm glad you asked!  So, the west side wall had a bit of damage from where we once mounted a mirrored window...


Because it wasn't extensive damage, so instead of replacing the wood I decided to cover the damage.  I put a couple shelves on the side wall, and used these cool threaded pipes as shelf brackets!


And went with a little asymmetric layout just for fun, and here's how that worked out!


And here's a nice shot of the finished product...


I love the way it turned out, but sheesh, it took weeks!  On to the next project!

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